Sep
20
to Nov 16

What Where

What Where is a new project by the Department of Ultimology, commissioned by steirischer herbst, Volksfronten 2018 and taking place at Grazer Kunstverein from 20 September to 16 November 2018. The project emerged from the establishment of an Ultimology Working Group in collaboration with artists/researchers Nina Höchtl and Julia Wieger.

As a methodology for creative and critical analysis, Ultimology is being applied to the cultural calendars of the people of Graz and Styria, Austria, in an attempt to measure the relationships individuals have with specific moments, events, traditions, rituals and practices unique to their environment. For example the project studies, amongst other things, the maintenance of traditional Styrian costumes (Trachten). As part of the resulting research based installation, a tailor-made questionnaire is available for visitors to reflect on folk or cultural elements specific to their own experience. Influenced by the structuring power of the seasons, the project takes its title from the last known play by Samuel Beckett, commissioned by steirischer herbst festival in 1983.

 

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What is Death? —A Neurohumanities Lunchtime Seminar
Aug
27
1:00 PM13:00

What is Death? —A Neurohumanities Lunchtime Seminar

In 1943, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger gave three public lectures entitled 'What is Life?' at Trinity College Dublin. These lectures expanded the field of biology, and we are marking their 75th anniversary with a special series of lunchtime seminars.

Returning to the theatre in which Schrödinger delivered those iconic lectures, we will discuss the exciting and dynamic interface between neuroscience and the humanities, as part of Trinity College Dublin's Neurohumanities programme. Each seminar will be chaired by an academic whose research intersects with the themes of "What is Life?", and will feature four speakers—two from the sciences, and two from the humanities.

Our second discussion will explore the the theme of DEATH, and will be chaired by Fiona Hallinan, founder of Department of Ultimology—an art research project initiated as part of the Trinity Creative Challenge 2015, and hosted by CONNECT the Centre for Future Networks. Speakers will include Ellen Finn (Trinity Long Room Hub), Alexandra Grieser (Dept of Religions and Theology), Ann Murphy (Clinical Psychiatry), and Siobhán O’Sullivan (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland).

Light lunch will be provided after the seminar.

Tickets are free but should be reserved via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/what-is-deatha-neurohumanities-lunchtime-seminar-tickets-48991614237

About the Series

The What is Life? — Neurohumanities Lunchtime Seminar Seriesis organised as part of Schrödinger at 75—The Future of Biology, a major conference to mark the 75th anniversary of "What is Life?" taking place in the National Concert Gall on the 5th and 6th of September, 2018.

The Neurohumanities programme is supported by a 2016 Wellcome Trust ISSF Award to Trinity College Dublin. This collaborative programme is directed by the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience (TCIN), Trinity Long Room Hub (TLRH) and Science Gallery Dublin (SGD), chaired by Mani Ramaswami, Director TCIN and supported by Aisling Hume in the TCIN.

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An Introduction to the Department of Ultimology
Nov
16
6:30 PM18:30

An Introduction to the Department of Ultimology

Ultimology is the study of that which is dead or dying in a series or process. When applied to academic disciplines, it becomes the study of extinct or endangered subjects, theories, and tools of learning. 

The first Department of Ultimology was established in 2016, at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Operating from the department's headquarters at CONNECT, a research centre for future networks, the department conducts qualitative research into endangered subjects within academic disciplines across the university, as a way to explore the evolution and disappearance of forms of knowledge that in turn shape academia and the educational context. This research informs an ongoing process of artistic responses, including new commissions, collaborative events and the forthcoming launch of a multi-format journal.

Ultimology is not only relevant within the university environment. Founding researchers artist Fiona Hallinan and curator Kate Strain have come to New York to investigate what other fields the discipline of Ultimology may be usefully applied to.  

Join us at the Endangered Language Alliance to find out more about the discipline, its activities, commissions and methodologies, and how Ultimology might be applied to your own research or practice as a tool for self reflection and critique.

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Research Purge
Oct
17
1:00 PM13:00

Research Purge

 Pizza break at Research Purge, Trinity College Dublin, 17 October, 2017. Photography by Kate Strain.

Pizza break at Research Purge, Trinity College Dublin, 17 October, 2017. Photography by Kate Strain.

DATE: Tuesday 17 October | TIME: 1pm - 2pm | PLACE: The Seminar Room, Connect Centre, Dunlop Oriel House, 34 Westland Row, Dublin

It can be hard to let go of ideas. Research reputations tend to be built on becoming well known in a specific area and doing more of the same thing. Letting an idea, approach or concept die off, and doing so with awareness can be daunting but may provide a path towards thinking of something really different and unusual.

At Research Purge, the Department of Ultimology offers an opportunity to consciously discard old ideas that might have reached the end of their lifespan. In an atmosphere of collective support, invited speakers will present ideas that they are ready to expel.

Join us for this ritual of letting go on October 17th in the seminar room at CONNECT, from 1pm–2pm. With contributions from Elma Avdic & Harun Siljak, Neal McBride, Luiz Da Silva, and Andreas Kindler von Knobloch.

Light lunch provided.

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On the Afterlife of Endangered Languages
Jul
25
7:00 PM19:00

On the Afterlife of Endangered Languages

 Ross Perlin at The Teacher's Club Dublin, July 25, 2017. Photography by Fiona Hallinan.

Ross Perlin at The Teacher's Club Dublin, July 25, 2017. Photography by Fiona Hallinan.

The Teacher's Club, Parnell Square, Dublin 1.

All welcome

A presentation by Ross Perlin of the Endangered Language Alliance, New York.

Starting in the early 1990s, inspired by the push to protect endangered species facing the "Sixth Extinction", linguists launched an unprecedented push to document endangered languages, working with communities all over the world. It soon became clear that half of the world’s approximately 7,000 languages, devastated by centuries of imperialism, nationalism, and capitalism, were facing extinction within a century. Thus began a race to develop new tools and new strategies to record the words of last speakers, some of whom became well-known singular symbols of an otherwise unfathomable and relentless process of cultural and linguistic loss: Boa Sr. (Aka-Bo), Marie Smith Jones (Eyak), Cristina Calderón (Yaghan), and others. Yet the focus on last speakers, in the media and in the popular imagination, has obscured the more complex reality of linguistic traditions remembered, half-remembered, or carried on among a scattering of people, in many different ways.

Drawing on his work as a director of the Endangered Language Alliance, a non-profit in New York, Ross Perlin discussed the world of endangered languages and what linguists and activists are doing to document, maintain, and archive them. As the reality of language loss sets in, the focus is shifting in some parts of the world to revitalization — a kind of linguistic de-extinction, resulting in something both old and new — and to a variety of strategies which may allow languages, with the help of the internet, to enjoy a strange “post-vernacular” afterlife. 

" As languages die, thousands of years of accumulated human knowledge, experience, creativity and evolution goes with them. Ken Hale, an MIT professor and language activist once said that losing any one language “is like dropping a bomb on the Louvre”. " Endangered Language Alliance

Listen below for a full audio recording of this event

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Address to the Metaphysical Society
Mar
27
7:30 PM19:30

Address to the Metaphysical Society

 An Address to the Metaphysical Society, March 27 2017, Photography by Paula Alvarez

An Address to the Metaphysical Society, March 27 2017, Photography by Paula Alvarez

An Address to the Metaphysical Society at the Edmund Burke Lecture Theatre, Trinity Arts Block, Trinity College Dublin.

This event involved the following components: a list of things that are dead or dying, a questionnaire, a heartbeat, an audience, speakers (human and non-human), writing instruments, writing, instruments, seating, doors, a voice, thoughts, answers, blanks.

The event lasted approximately one hour, and featured contributions from Sean Carpio and Barry Edward Fitzgerald. Everyone was welcome to attend.

The Metaphysical Society, founded in 1929 by A. A. Luce, is the Philosophy Society of Trinity College as well as a home for inter-disciplinary debate and discussion in Trinity College Dublin. The Metafizz has hosted guest speakers from a range of academic disciplines and other walks of public life. Some guests who have addressed the society in the past include: philosophers (Gilbert Ryle, David Papineau, Volker Halbach, Robin le Poidevin, Timothy Williamson, David Chalmers, Ray Monk, Helen Beebee, J. L. Austin, John Mackie, Antony Flew, Graham Priest, Daniel Dennett, A. C. Grayling, and Richard Swinburne), scientists (Erwin Schrodinger, Rupert Sheldrake, Susan Greenfield, Susan Blackmoor, and Lawrence Krauss), political scientists (Norman Finkelstein and Eoin O'Malley), artists (Anne Enright, Cynthia Macdonald, Graham Linehan, and Lenny Abrahamson), politicians (Minister Ruairi Quinn and Senator Ivana Bacik), and journalists (Patsy McGarry and Peter Hitchens), as well as theologians, geneticists, economists, lawyers, and activists of many stripes. We are thrilled, as founding Ultimologists, to have been invited to join this esteemed list.

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Programme Launch
Feb
20
11:00 AM11:00

Programme Launch

 Department of Ultimology Programme Launch, February 20, 2017, CONNECT. Photography by Louis Haugh.

Department of Ultimology Programme Launch, February 20, 2017, CONNECT. Photography by Louis Haugh.

Fiona Hallinan (artist/researcher in residence), and Kate Strain (curator in residence) are delighted to mark the launch of the 2017 Department of Ultimology Programme, with an event on Monday 20th February, from 11am to 12 noon, in the seminar room of CONNECT, Dunlop Oriel House, Westland Row, Dublin 2. (Map here).


Please join us for a short morning session to hear more about the Department, its undertakings, and our planned activities for the year, including regular Ultimology clinics. Find out how you can get involved, what Ultimology can do for you, and how to apply it to your own research or practice.

There will be a presentation followed by refreshments. Everyone is welcome.

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